Cold Brew Coffee Guide

Cold brew coffee is an incredible alternative to your normal cup of joe. Brewed over a period of 12 – 18 hours at room temperature, the result is praised for an abnormally small amount of acid, making each sip easier on the stomach, teeth and pallet. Along with being refreshing and tasty, this brewing method is extremely simple and requires no equipment other than a generic container and filter. Served over ice, cold brew coffee will be one rewarding drink. If it wasn’t already great enough, the concentrate will remain fresh in the fridge for up to two weeks.

Cold Brew coffee


Thorough:

  • Measurements: 70g coffee, 500g water ( 17.5 oz)
  • Grind: Coarse
  • Filter: Any kind; I recommend Madesco Filters for their ease of use

1. Grind all 70 grams of coffee coarsely and place in any container. I like to use my French Press, but anything will do.

2. Measure out 500g of room temperature water and pour evenly into the container with coffee grounds.

3. Start a timer for 12 hours.

4. After ten minutes, break the crust formed by the grounds on top of the water and submerge them with a good stir, ensuring full saturation of all the coffee.

5. Wait.

6. After the 12 hours have passed, prepare another vessel and a filter.

7. Pour the coffee through a filter (or 2) into another container, disabling any particles from being present in the final drink.

8. The result is a clean concentrate which should be mixed with an equal amount of water (1 concentrate : 1 water).

9. Pour over ice, enjoy


Minimal:

1. 500g pour

2. Stir at 10:00

3. Filter at 12 hours

4. Dilute 1:1


Variations:

1. Steeping time can be increased up to 18 hours to maximize strength without over-extracting.

2. Use grind sizes accordingly with steeping time. The coarser the grind, the more time it will require. Too fine, however, and the concentrate will be over-extracted.


Common Problems:

1. If the result is extremely bitter or just tastes off, make sure you’ve added an equal amount of water to the concentrate.

2. If the problem still occurs, the solution is likely a coarser grind.